Hair salons and barbershops can reopen and in-person dining in restaurants can resume immediately with safeguards as Los Angeles County moves forward on the Roadmap to Recovery.

The State of California today approved the County’s request for a variance to state guidelines because the County has met the necessary public health thresholds to safely allow critical sectors of the economy and community to begin serving residents.

The County has demonstrated that it has controlled the spread of the virus, and is protecting residents and essential workers. Hospital testing and contact tracing capacity are appropriate in response to the outbreak. Los Angeles County is now in the advanced stages of Phase 2 of the State’s Resilience Roadmap.

This new phase of Los Angeles County’s reopening better aligns the County with neighboring counties, moving Southern California towards a regional recovery and supporting our service-oriented businesses, many of which are small and locally owned It’s a testament to the efforts of residents who adhered to the Safer At Home order, practiced physical distancing and wore cloth face coverings.

Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors. Photo Courtesy LACounty.gov

“This is an important milestone for Los Angeles County as we transition to being Safer at Work and Safer in our Communities and move forward in our path of reopening and recovery,” said Supervisor Kathryn Barger, Chair of the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors. “I am grateful to our state and local leaders for their partnership and collaboration in supporting the residents and businesses of Los Angeles County.”

However, this step forward doesn’t mean the threat of COVID-19 is gone. Residents must continue to practice physical distancing, wear cloth face coverings and follow public health guidelines in place.

If at any time, the County’s rate of infection and other key metrics return to unsafe numbers, the Department of Public Health can limit or close reopened sectors.

“Small businesses are the lifeblood of our economy and we all should do our part to help them stay open safely,” Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas said.

“Like my colleagues I am happy that so many will return to work and familiar activities. Still, I cannot overemphasize the importance of the public’s role in making these next steps a success,” said Supervisor Sheila Kuehl. “People must continue to physically distance, wear face covers, and wash their hands often. If not, our cases and hospitalizations are likely to rise dramatically, forcing us to consider reducing access in order to protect public health.”

Dining in restaurants and getting a haircut will be a different experience than we’re used to. Just as is required for all out-of-home activities, clients and staff will have to practice physical distancing and wear cloth face coverings. There will be limited capacity and enhanced cleaning and disinfecting procedures.

Key, specific guidelines for customers at hair salons, barbershops and in-person restaurant dining include physical distancing measures, employees and customers will be screened for symptoms, including cough and fever. Patrons feeling unwell should not eat at a restaurant, customers will be asked to wait for their table in their cars or outside the restaurant to prevent crowds from gathering, diners must wear cloth face coverings when not eating, and occupancy capacity will be limited to 60% for the next three weeks.

For the detailed protocol visit: http://www.publichealth.lacounty.gov/media/coronavirus/.

Los Angeles County is under a Safer At Work And In The Community order and public and private gatherings of people outside of a single household unit are not permitted except for public protests and faith-based services, which are permitted to operate with limits on the number of participants.

Everyone must continue to follow physical distancing and infection control protocols and wear a cloth face covering when in contact with others not in your household.

Gyms and fitness centers, beach piers, indoor entertainment venues including arcades, bowling alleys, movie theaters, live performance theaters, concert halls, stadiums, arenas, theme parks, gaming facilities and festivals, indoor museums, galleries and zoos are still closed to the public.